1 Mazugis

Essay Outline Template Compare And Contrast Topics

Students like writing compare and contrast essays as they have enough space for creativity. Such papers allow expressing your thoughts regarding some contradictive issues. It makes more fun to draw a parallel between two people or objects instead of describing a single issue.

It does not mean, however, that compare and contrast essay is an easy assignment to complete. There are so many possible compare and contrast essay topics, and some of them are hard to carry out.

Keys to Writing Compare & Contrast Essay

Before you start, it is crucial to choose topics that you really know well. Most often, you should find two things that have enough differences and similarities. You can take two pets, cats and dogs, while comparing a food (i.e., banana) with music (i.e., hard rock) basically, makes no sense.

Of course, if you're a part of Arts class where tutor appreciates uncommon parallelism, you may try your luck in your compare and contrast essay. You may talk about a sense of taste and the book of your favorite author. For instance, you may try to explain how it tastes to be Dracula. Or you can highlight how it smells to be Jean-Baptiste Grenouille from famous novel Perfume: The Story of a Murderer. Such creative comparisons are often appreciated and awarded with more than "A." Original and unexpected compare and contrast essay topics serve as your ticket to special universities where Arts are studied. Along with a personal statement written by professional writers, such essay will increase your chances to get enrolled.

Sources to be Used

In any case, writing about things to compare and contrast is an activity which requires your full attention and creativity. But when you have to compare things objectively, you should operate facts. Just like an argumentative essay, your text will need corresponding evidence. Search for the primary and secondary sources on the given topics before you start your first draft. Make sure these sources are no older than 5 years. They should be as relevant as possible. Don't forget to apply only credible sources to reveal your topics. Those are:

  • Textbooks
  • Books
  • Documentaries
  • Academic journals
  • Scientific magazines
  • Newspapers
  • Official reports

CHECK OUT QUICK SOLUTION TO YOUR TASK

How to Write a Compare and Contrast Essay

The traditional essay tips won't work with compare and contrast paper. We have gathered the best ideas online to share with students. If you write such assignment for the first time in your school or college life, read information from us.

You need to keep in mind the most common writing mistakes school and college students make to avoid them.

Start with the type of your compare and contrast essay topic. The topics are divided into 4 different groups:

  • Events (point to the differences and similarities of some historical events or episodes from the book)
  • Situations (choose to compare two different cases or episodes from your life)
  • People or fiction characters (choose the story)
  • Places (describe different locations)

No matter what comparison and contrast topics you write on, you need to keep to the traditional structure of the academic paper.

Start with a capturing and interesting hook. Outline what your topic is. Point to the main argument of your topic known as a thesis statement. This sentence or two usually come in the last sentence of your first paragraph.

  • Developing your arguments

You need to research your topic to choose three claims. Include evidence with the supporting points next to each argument. There should be up to three supporting points in each body paragraphs.

  • Refuting opponent's arguments

This time, you need to research the topic to view the facts that contradict your thesis. It is important to choose at least one example and develop a paragraph with the counter-argument as well. Write down maximum two opposing views followed by a couple of your refutations.

Restate your thesis statement and stress why your side is right once again.

You can learn more information on the structure of five-paragraph paper online.

Writing Tips Used by Smart American College Students

Moreover, use such helpful words as "because,""for example," "the writer mentioned...," "according to the book/movie," "from the given reading, we know that...," "on the following page, I have found..."

Examples:

"Why do you believe Americans will win the next Olympic games?"

"According to the reading I have found in my college library, their team showed better results than Canadians during the last games."

  1. Check possible examples of compare and contrast essays when working in your hook sentence. It has a great influence on the reader's decision whether to read your text on a specific topic or not. You may add numbers, figures, facts - whatever to make your reader interested. On the whole, there are many types of hooks:
  • Anecdotes and jokes
  • Literary quotes
  • Quotes of famous people
  • Lines from poetry
  • Setting scenes
  • Scientific facts
  • Questions and rhetorical questions
  • Metaphors and similes
  • Thesis statements

We think it is better to write a thesis statement in the last sentence of the argumentative essay’s introduction to conclude.

  1. Brainstorm all the time. The best way to decide on two good compare and contrast topics to analyze is to brainstorm and write down possible versions on a blank paper. Once you choose the subjects, you have to organize your thoughts. Prepare a table where you will mention both similarities and differences between the two subjects.
  2. Get professional help and examples. Find online educational services which help to choose some good sources on the given topic. Those can be movies, books, articles, etc. It is the last pre-writing stage which is known as a literature review. School and college students conduct in-depth research to enrich their compare and contrast essay drafts with important details. If you miss any words to finish your essay, a literature review is a brilliant way to reach the necessary word count.
  3. Don't forget about the formatting and in-text citations. Apply direct and indirect quotes to make your text longer and more persuasive. Citations will serve as the strong evidence to support your compare and contrast topics.

It was just a short preview of every section of your compare and contrast paper in English. Selecting the proper topics might take a while if you don't have a list of sample topics in front of you. We are ready to share the best compare and contrast essay subjects with you right now. You may use any example as the subject for your comparative essay when the theme is not assigned to you.

Compare and Contrast Essay Topics for College Students

We have divided the topics into several categories to make it easier to select one. The list starts with the most relevant subjects college students usually discuss. Other categories are full of great ideas too.

  1. School vs. College: What's New?
  2. Students Who Work and Unemployed Students: Who Takes the Best of This Life?
  3. Research Paper and Essay: What Is More Responsible?
  4. American English vs. British English: Major Differences
  5. What Makes Education and Employment Similar?
  6. SAT and TOEFL: Differences and Similarities
  7. How Are Master Degree and Ph.D. different?
  8. Persuasive and Argumentative Paper: Different or the Same
  9. Traditional Education or Remote Learning?

History and Political Compare and Contrast Essay Topics

  1. Comparison of Lincoln's and Washington' Ideas
  2. Renaissance vs. Baroque Epoch
  3. Anthropology vs. Religious Studies
  4. American Government vs. Soviet Government
  5. US President vs. UK Prime Minister
  6. North and South Before the Civil War in the US
  7. Henry VIII vs. King Louis XIV
  8. Fascism and Nazism: Different or the Same?
  9. World War I and World War II: Difference in Events

Compare and Contrast Topics for Beginners

  1. Compare Apple and Orange
  2. Night Time and Day Time: Advantages Each Period Has
  3. What Makes People Completely Different from Animals
  4. Living in Poverty and Being Rich
  5. Coffee and Tea: The Effects of Both
  6. Living in Big City or Staying in Village
  7. Feeling Sad against Feeling Lonely
  8. Differences and Similarities between American and British Traditional Dishes
  9. Camping in the Woods or Resting by the Sea?

Opposite Things to Compare and Contrast

  1. Females and Males
  2. Coke vs. Pepsi
  3. Red vs. White
  4. Country in War Compared to Country in Peace
  5. Driving a Car or Riding a Bus
  6. Love and Hatred
  7. Bad and Good Aspects of Overwork
  8. Moon and Sun
  9. Dolls or Soft Toys: What Should Parents Buy to Their Children?

Ideas Teenagers May Use in Their Papers

  1. Childhood vs. Adulthood
  2. Living at Home or Living on Campus
  3. Reading or Watching Screened Versions: What Teens Prefer
  4. Working in Office or Being a Freelancer?
  5. Academic Writing vs. Scientific Writing
  6. TV Shows and Radio Shows: What Is More Trendy?
  7. Education or Professional Career: What Is Easier and What Is More Difficult?
  8. Greek and Roman Culture: Differences and Similarities
  9. Comparing Art and Science Classes

TIME TO BUY YOUR ESSAY HERE!

IT & Social Media Compare & Contrast Ideas

  1. E-mail or Traditional Mailing: What Will Happen in the Future?
  2. Online vs. Traditional Commerce
  3. Online Dating vs. Real-Life Relations
  4. Computer Games, Video Games, or Smartphone Games
  5. Choosing between New York Times and Forbes
  6. FaceBook or MySpace: Which Social Network Offers More Opportunities?
  7. Searching for Job Online or Traditionally?
  8. Using Online Writing Services against Traditional Writing Services
  9. Benefits Marketing Specialists Get from Using Online Advertising vs. Traditional One

Movie & Music Compare and Contrast Themes

  1. Buffy, the Vampire Slayer or Charmed?
  2. Books against Movies: Why Reading Is Preferred
  3. Jazz vs. Rock
  4. Sam vs. Frodo Baggins (Lord of the Rings)
  5. Gandalf vs. Dumbledore
  6. American Cinematography vs. Soviet Union Cinematography
  7. Thor and Loki: Friends or Enemies According to Movie of 2009?
  8. Horror Films and Thrillers: What's in Common?
  9. Harry Potter or Draco Malfoy?

Literature Compare & Contrast Ideas

  1. Comedy vs. Drama
  2. Greek vs. Roman Mythology
  3. Beauty and the Beast: Lessons Learned
  4. Prose or Lyrics: What People Prefer More and Why?
  5. Poetry of XIII Century and Nowadays Lyrics
  6. Shakespeare's Othello Compared to Hamlet
  7. Fiction or Non-Fiction Literature: When You May Need Different Types?
  8. Lord of the Rings and Harry Potter: Which Fantasy Book Is Better?
  9. Literature of the Past against Literature of the Future

Scientific Compare & Contrast Ideas

  1. Oven vs. Microwave
  2. Physics vs. Chemistry
  3. Our Galaxy, Milky Way, and Andromeda, the Closest
  4. What Makes Earth Different from Mars
  5. First Mission to Moon and Second Visit: What Are the Differences and Similarities?
  6. Thomas Jefferson or DaVinci: Whose Innovations Matter More?
  7. Earthquakes or Tsunami: Which Consequences Are Worse?
  8. Limited Control Tools or Software with Fool Access to Navigation
  9. Formulas of Two Different Chemical Reactions

Popular Compare & Contrast Ideas

  1. Soccer vs. Football
  2. Chinese vs. Korean
  3. Public Opinion vs. Personal Point of View: Discuss Subjectivity & Objectivity
  4. Juice and Water
  5. Light Beer vs. Dark Beer: Which One Is More Popular?
  6. Anorexia Nervosa and Obesity: What Is More Dangerous?
  7. Marriage and Divorce: Two Sides of the Coin
  8. Windows or Linux: Paid vs. Free OS
  9. Marxism vs. Other Ideas of Capitalism

Philosophy Compare & Contrast Ideas

  1. Is Home Really a Better Place Than Miami Beach?
  2. Life and Death: Various Philosophical Views
  3. Living in Your Dreams or Living in Reality: Pros and Cons
  4. Friends and ... Where Is the Edge?
  5. Physical & Mental Needs of Human Beings
  6. Reality or Fantasy World?
  7. Main Philosophical Ideas of Macbeth against the Main Ideas of Hamlet
  8. Dogs and Humans: They Are More Similar Than We Think
  9. Sources with Free Access and Rights Reserved: Should We Protect Intellectual Property?
  10. Greek Philosophers vs. Roman Philosophers

Compare and contrast essay topics for college students might be tricky to choose. The whole process of academic writing is even longer and more complex. Online help from expert writers will save you a plenty of time. You just need to order a good essay from experts with the highest academic degrees in a variety of fields.

WE CAN WRITE FOR YOU ANY ACADEMIC TASK!

 Wishing for a magic writing solution? – We’ve got one for you 

Get a price quote & proceed with the order!

Throughout the course of your education and career (if you choose to become a writer), you’ll have the opportunity to work on different writing assignments and, of course, essays are inevitable. The essay is a piece of writing that methodically analyzes and evaluates a topic or issue. That’s why there are different types of essays, used to discuss, analyze, evaluate, or compare different situations or subjects e.g. argumentative essay, cause and effect essay, and compare and contrast essay. Your ability to create an excellent paper depends on structuring a perfect outline. Throughout this post, I’m going to show you how to compose an outline for compare and contrast essay to get good grades (or positive feedback from the client) every time.

Compare and contrast essay outline

The easiest definition of compare and contrast essay that explore both the similarities and differences between two subjects by comparing or contrasting them. It’s very easy to mistake this style of essay writing for a simple comparison between some topics or subjects, but that’s not entirely correct. Always bear in mind that your essay has to serve a larger purpose and include the following:

  • Demonstrate that one thing is superior to another
  • Identify and clarify common misunderstandings
  • Provide a new way of doing or understanding something
  • State, elaborate, discuss something unknown
  • Support every claim with facts and accurate, reliable sources

When it comes to structuring the outline for this kind of essay, there are different methods you can follow depending on the organization.

Point-by-point pattern (organization by criteria)

This outline is primarily used to compare items or subjects that are almost similar or when you plan (or have to) evaluate only a few characteristics or criteria when comparing them. Use the diagram below to create the outline for the point-by-point pattern.

Block pattern (organization by item)

In instances when you have to compare items, situations, or topics that are entirely different or when there are multiple criteria to involve, the point-by-point pattern doesn’t function quite well. That’s why you should opt for block pattern or organization by item.

Why? The reason is simple; the same criteria don’t apply to different topics, people, objects, events, and so on. When the essay requires a multitude of approaches to explore, it’s important to learn how to organize it properly in a bid to ensure easy reading. Create the outline based on the diagram below.

Block pattern can be structured in a different manner as well. Instead of the separate paragraph for each point, you compare, you can set out one section to name their similarities and a second paragraph to analyze dissimilarities point by point.

Now that you know how to create a functional outline, you’re ready to move on to the essay writing process.

Introduction

The intro for this kind of essay doesn’t differ much from other types. It’s the part where you introduce the overall subject of the piece and specific items, situations, or events you have to compare and/or contrast. As seen in diagrams, the introduction should feature:

  • The mentioning of the main topic – begin with a hook sentence and detail specific to the topic itself. Your hook can be a quote, question, anecdote, anything you see fit for the particular subject you have to write about
  • Specific subjects to compare and contrast – of course, you can’t start writing about similarities and differences between two items out of the blue. That’s why you should set out a sentence or two to mention specific topics you’ll compare under the central theme
  • Thesis statement – it marks the tone of the essay and catches reader’s attention. Last sentence (or two) of your paper should account for a specific and concise thesis. There’s no need for wordiness in this part because thesis, as the entire introduction, shouldn’t be too long.

Once you’re done with the intro, you’re ready to move on to the body paragraphs.

Body paragraphs

A total number of paragraphs in the body section depends on a number of aspects or criteria you have to discuss. For example, if you have to make a comparison between two different events through two aspects, you’ll need two paragraphs. Three criteria require three paragraphs, and so on. Sometimes, you’ll get the amount of aspects to use for comparison/contrast from your professor or a client, while in other instances, you’ll just have to determine the number yourself during the research process.

When you get the title and aspects to compare but without a certain number of criteria to cover similarities and differences, you have to brainstorm. Take a blank piece of paper and write the first item in the left corner, the second item in the right corner. Make a Venn diagram and start analyzing.

REMEMBER: Typically, you don’t need more than three aspects to cover, unless otherwise noted.

When you start brainstorming and researching the topic, the chances are high you’ll find a wide array of differences and similarities. However, your essay has to be well-crafted, and you can’t include absolutely everything you find (that way you’d write forever). To determine what to compare or differentiate answer these questions:

  • Is this relevant for my course?
  • What matters to the argument I’m going to take (or I’m given)?
  • What’s informative and interesting?
  • What’s relevant to my assignment?

Each paragraph in the body should start with a topic sentence (point 1, criterion 1/item A, B) focused on the aspect you’re about to compare/contrast. Then, you proceed with details you find when conducting research. Remember, just like in other types of essays, thorough research is highly relevant here, too.

It’s not just about mentioning differences and similarities one by one and stating your opinion or argument about them. Every detail you find should be supported by substantial evidence, statistics, studies, official data, and so on.

To show comparisons and emphasize the overall effect, don’t forget to use some connectors such as:

  • At the same time, as well as
  • Both
  • Compared to
  • Correspondingly
  • In addition
  • In the same way
  • Just as
  • Likewise
  • Same as
  • Similarly

Of course, you can include connectors to express or heighten the contrasting effect. For example:

  • Conversely
  • Even though, although
  • However
  • In contrast
  • Meanwhile
  • Nevertheless
  • On the contrary
  • On the other hand
  • Unlike

For the best possible result and successful completion of the essay, the body paragraphs should be analyzed from the perspective of an independent analytic. Ideally, your paper shouldn’t be biased. You don’t want the reader of your paper to assume what item you prefer or despise automatically.

Conclusion

At this point, you have the introduction and body paragraphs, which indicates you’re ready to conclude the essay. Generally, this is the easiest part, but you should ensure it’s properly structured as well. Here’s what your conclusion should contain:

  • Summary of main points – at the very beginning of this part, you should summarize the main points you’ve made throughout the essay. It’s important to synthesize your thesis with info in body paragraphs
  • Evaluation – provide a short analysis of what you discussed in the paper or mention possible solutions. The approach depends on the nature of your subject
  • Significance – not only do you have to clarify the importance of the main topic, but also mention the significance of comparisons or contrasts. How to do this? It’s not that difficult; answer the What was my goal in showing similarities/differences between these items? Your response indicates their significance.

Post-writing stage

You finished writing the paper, but your work isn’t over just yet. Before sending or submitting the essay, it’s necessary to proofread and edit the paper to eliminate all mistakes and unwanted parts.

Proofreading isn’t only necessary for correcting typos or grammar, these seemingly unimportant errors that “everyone makes” break the reader from the flow of the paper and undermine its power of persuasion. When you finish the essay, read your work from top to bottom without doing anything. You’ll probably spot some mistakes, but don’t rush correcting them immediately. Then, start reading again and correct typos, grammar errors, and sentence constructions. Don’t resist the urge to rewrite some sentences for better effect.

Nowadays, in the era of technology, you might feel tempted to download software (or find grammar/spelling checker online) and let it do the work for you. First of all, they aren’t always correct, and secondly, your critical thinking skills will improve only when you do it yourself. The software can be used as additional essay help. Another useful idea is to ask a family member or a friend to read the essay and see if they can spot some mistakes.

You’re almost ready to submit your essay, check whether you included references (if not, do so) and you’re done.

Bottom line

Compare, and contrast essay is concerned with evaluating differences and similarities between given items or topics. It’s not just a mere comparison; the essay requires thorough evaluation and analysis supported by reliable data. This post explained how to create the outline properly, and all you have to do is to write according to the structure provided. Remember, once you create the structure and choose the adequate pattern (point-by-point or block), you just have to fill in the missing detail with results of your search.

Leave a Comment

(0 Comments)

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *