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Compare And Contrast Essay Lesson Plan High School

Compare and Contrast Writing

Alike or Different? You Be the Judge
Students write an expository paragraph after comparing and contrasting items of texture, taste, odor, and visual appearance. This activity will work with students from upper elementary through high school. Lesson includes student handout and rubric.

Compare and Contrast Lesson Plan
Students use a Venn diagram to compare and contrast. Introductory activity leads to reinforcement with a story. Designed for grades K-5.

Comparing and Contrasting
This site emphasizes construction of the thesis statement. It is designed for college freshmen.

Comparison and Contrast Guide
The Comparison and Contrast Guide outlines the characteristics of the genre and provides direct instruction on the methods of organizing, gathering ideas, and writing comparison and contrast essays. This resource is designed for elementary students to use independently.

Forty Topic Suggestions: Comparison and Contrast
Scroll down on the page for a list of topics designed for high school or college students.

A Pair of Anything
Students use a Venn diagram as a prewriting activity for a compare/contrast essay. This page includes a rubric.

Teaching the Compare/Contrast Essay
This lesson plan includes explanations, a timeline, and handouts. At this site, the same material annotated by a master teacher. These materials work with middle and high school students.

Writing a Comparative Analysis , a handout from The Writing Center at Harvard
Explanation of both traditional compare/contrast and "lens" papers, suggestions for organization.



This post about preparing for Common Core assessments offers new material developed by Sarah Tantillo, the author of Literacy and the Common Core: Recipes for Action (Jossey-Bass, 2014) and The Literacy Cookbook (Jossey-Bass, 2012). Be sure to browse her links to other PARCC Prep articles at the end of this post. And check out her website, The Literacy Cookbook, and her TLC Blog.

by Sarah Tantillo

In the PARCC literary analysis task, students must closely analyze two literary texts—often focusing on their themes or points of view—and compare and contrast these texts.

In previous posts, I’ve proposed a lesson series to tackle this task and a tool for teaching students how to infer theme, which is a common requirement since Common Core Reading Anchor Standard #2 isDetermine central ideas or themes of a text and analyze their development; summarize the key supporting details and ideas.”

This post deals with the challenge of how to organize a compare-and-contrast essay. Many students struggle with this task, I believe, for two reasons:

(1)  Teachers often rely on Venn diagrams to teach the concept of “compare and contrast,” and Venn diagrams are not a useful way to organize writing. They were meant for discussions around set theory, not for essay writing. Seriously. Could you write an essay from notes inserted into this?

(2) Teachers tend to assume that students can transfer their “understandings” from Venn diagrams into full-blown essays, so they don’t spend enough time explaining how to outline and develop the evidence and explanation needed.

Use charts, not Venns

As I’ve noted previously (here and here), instead of trying to fill in Venn diagrams, students should annotate texts with charts that have either two or three columns, depending on the number of texts. For literary analysis, it’s two; for research writing, it’s two texts and a video. Students then put checkmarks next to items that the texts have in common. What remains unchecked should be dealt with in the “contrast” paragraphs.

But you can’t easily write an essay from those notes. You have to organize your ideas.

Here is a simple graphic organizer to help students turn those notes into an outline for writing (click on the image to download a student-friendly PDF version).

As always, students will need lots of modeling and practice to master this step.

Editor’s note: Sarah Tantillo has agreed to share her other PARCC Prep materials with our readers. Just click to access these various posts at her blog. Visit her TLC “PARCC Prep” page to stay up to date with her Common Core assessment materials.

PARCC Prep READING RESOURCES:

General Information:

PARCC Prep WRITING RESOURCES:

General Information:

Research Writing Tasks:

Narrative Writing Tasks:

Literary Analysis Writing Tasks:

 

Sarah Tantillo writes frequently for MiddleWeb about literacy and the Common Core. She is the author of Literacy and the Common Core: Recipes for Action and The Literacy Cookbook: A Practical Guide to Effective Reading, Writing, Speaking, and Listening Instruction. Sarah consults with schools on literacy instruction, curriculum development, data-driven instruction, and school culture-building. Sarah has taught high school English and Humanities in both suburban and urban public schools, including the high-performing North Star Academy Charter School of Newark. Visit her website.

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