1 Gogor

Coming Of Age In New Zealand Film Dissertation

This year marks the centenary of the ANZAC landings at Gallipoli on 25 April 1915.

Since 1921, when ANZAC Day celebrations began, the landings at Anzac Cove have become part of our national myth-making – that New Zealand ‘came of age’ on the beaches of Gallipoli, where our boys ‘spilled their blood’ in 1915.

‘Coming of age’ at Gallipoli however is more myth than fact. It’s a story now buried deep in our national psyche with no affirming historical roots in our earlier histories.

Quite the reverse – it’s a day that forgets all that went before, especially for Māori. Every ANZAC Day, though, you will hear ‘coming of age’ repeated often, especially by those who have benefited from its political and historical utiliy.  

Occasionally, you will hear calls for ANZAC Day to be our national day; Waitangi Day, it is said, is too divisive. If you would like to read more about this debate, read Danny’s article  published in Mana : click here – ANZAC or Waitangi?  (The reference is Mana, no 92, February-March 2012, pp. 44-45).

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There are many other events to commemorate this year; here are some of them  .. 

‘Other’ 2015 Anniversaries 

1805Governor King in Sydney prohibits the forced removal of Māori from New Zealand

1815Ruatara dies, leaving new missionaries exposed to the fearsome war chief, Hongi Hika

1825Christian Rangi, the first Māori ever converted, dies

1835First Christian pamphlet published for Māori by Colenso and missionaries

1845Northern War starts with British attack on Puketutu Pā, $100 bounty placed on Hone Heke’s head

1855British troops sent to New Plymouth as deterrent against Māori warfare

1865Taranaki Pai Marire prisoners transported to the South Island ; Native Land Court established (in the form it thereafter functioned) by the Native Lands Act 1865. The earlier 1862 Native Lands Act set up the Court as a Māori communal tribunal convened by the local Resident Magistrate. Finding this too slow and cumbersome, the government changed the Court’s structure in 1865 – one judge (or more) making all the decisions.

1875Native Minister McLean forbids surveying of the contested Waimate Plains, south of Parihaka

1885Rail link begins through the King Country, with Ngāti Maniapoto resistance finally overcome

1895Minnie Dean hanged in Dunedin

1905  New Zealand’s national rugby team called All Blacks for the first time, when playing Somerset at Tauton

1915    ANZAC troops land on the beach at Gallipoli, and New Zealand ‘comes of age’ ..

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Source: Alison Dench,  Essential Dates A Timeline of New Zealand History, Random House, Auckland, 2005.

Fox, A. (2016). Speaking pictures: Neuropsychoanalysis and authorship in film and literature. Bloomington, IN: Indiana University Press, 310p.

Fox, A., Marie, M., Moine, R., & Radner, H. (Eds.). (2015). A companion to contemporary French cinema [Translations by Alistair Fox]. Chichester, UK: John Wiley & Sons, 691p.

Fox, A. (Ed.). (2013). François Truffaut: The lost secret by Anne Gillian [Translated by Alistair Fox]. Bloomington, IN: Indiana University Press, 334p.

Fox, A. (2011). Jane Campion: Authorship and personal cinema. Bloomington, IN: Indiana University Press, 288p.

Fox, A. (2008). The ship of dreams: Masculinity in contemporary New Zealand fiction. Dunedin, New Zealand: Otago University Press, 230p.

Authored Book - Research

Fox, A. (2016). Speaking pictures: Neuropsychoanalysis and authorship in film and literature. Bloomington, IN: Indiana University Press, 310p.

Fox, A. (2011). Jane Campion: Authorship and personal cinema. Bloomington, IN: Indiana University Press, 288p.

Fox, A. (2008). The ship of dreams: Masculinity in contemporary New Zealand fiction. Dunedin, New Zealand: Otago University Press, 230p.

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Edited Book - Research

Fox, A., Marie, M., Moine, R., & Radner, H. (Eds.). (2015). A companion to contemporary French cinema [Translations by Alistair Fox]. Chichester, UK: John Wiley & Sons, 691p.

Fox, A. (Ed.). (2013). François Truffaut: The lost secret by Anne Gillian [Translated by Alistair Fox]. Bloomington, IN: Indiana University Press, 334p.

Fox, A., Grant, B. K., & Radner, H. (Eds.). (2011). New Zealand cinema: Interpreting the past. Bristol, UK: Intellect, 350p.

Radner, H., Fox, A., & Bessière, I. (Eds.). (2009). Jane Campion: Cinema, nation, identity. Detroit, MI: Wayne State University Press, 400p.

Fox, A., & Radner, H. (Eds.). (2008). Cinema genre by Raphaëlle Moine [Translated by Alistair Fox and Hilary Radner]. Malden, MA: Blackwell, 248p.

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Chapter in Book - Research

Fox, A. (2016). François Truffaut. In K. Gabbard (Ed.), Oxford bibliographies: Cinema and media studies. Oxford University Press. doi: 10.1093/obo/9780199791286-0198

Fox, A. (2013). Exploring the dynamics of epochal change: Shifting identities in the historical novels of Heretaunga Pat Baker:Behind the Tattooed Face, and The Strongest God. In J. Bessière & S. André (Eds.), Littératures du Pacifique insulaire: Nouvelle-Calédonie, Nouvelle-Zélande, Océanie, Timor Oriental Approches historiques, culturelles et comparatives [Literatures of the Pacific Islands: New Caledonia, New Zealand, Oceania, East Timor Historical, Cultural and Comparative Perspectives. (pp. 81-93). Paris: Honoré Champion.

Fox, A. (2011). Hybridity and indigeneity in contemporary Maori literature of Aotearoa/New Zealand: Witi Ihimaera. In J. Bessière (Ed.), Littératures d'aujourd'hui: Contemporain, innovation, partages culturels, politique, théorie littéraire: Domaines européan, latino-américain, francophone et anglophone. (pp. 91-101). Paris: Honoré Champion.

Fox, A. (2011). Jane Campion. In Oxford bibliographies online. Oxford University Press. doi: 10.1093/OBO/9780199791286-0039

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Journal - Research Article

Fox, A. (2010). Italy in the Maori imaginary: The novels of Witi Ihimaera and Te Tangata Whai Rawa o Weniti / The Maori merchant of Venice. CNZS Bulletin of New Zealand Studies, 2, 1-13.

Fox, A. (2009). Inwardness, insularity, and the Man Alone: Postcolonial anxiety in the New Zealand novel. Journal of Postcolonial Writing, 45(3), 265-275. doi: 10.1080/17449850903064690

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