1 Bajinn

Barnes Rosset Bibliography

Maintained by Sherri, official Literary Kicks bibliographer The following is a general bibliography, listing works not specifically about any one Beat author. Bibliographies of books and articles about Jack Kerouac, Allen Ginsberg and Ken Kesey are also available. Further bibliographies will follow.

(Note: these bibliographies are books about the Beat movement and the individual writers; lists of each writer's works are available under each writer's name in the main section of Literary Kicks.)

(Updated 1999)

POPULAR READING ON THE SUBJECT OF THE BEAT GENERATION:

Ash, Mel. BEAT SPIRIT: THE WAY OF THE BEAT WRITERS AS A LIVING EXPERIENCE. New York: Putnam, 1997.

Bartlett, Jeffrey. ONE VAST PAGE: ESSAYS ON THE BEAT WRITERS, THEIR BOOKS AND MY LIFE. Berkeley: J. Bartlett, 1991.

THE BEAT BOOK. Boston: Shambhala, 1995.

THE BEAT GENERATION WRITERS. Boulder, CO: Pluto Press, 1995.

BIG SKY MIND: BUDDHISM AND THE BEAT GENERATION. NY: Riverhead Books, 1995.

Carr, R., B. Case, and F. Dellar. THE HIP: HIPSTERS, JAZZ AND THE BEAT GENERATION. Faber and Faber, 1986.

Charters, Ann. BEATS AND COMPANY, PORTRAIT OF A LITERARY GENERATION. Dolphin Doubleday, 1986.

Cherkovski, Neelie. WHITMAN'S WILD CHILDREN. Lapis, 1989.

Cook, Bruce. THE BEAT GENERATION. NY: Scribner, 1971.

Davidson, Michael. THE SAN FRANCISCO RENAISSANCE, POETICS AND COMMUNITY AT MID-CENTURY. Cambridge University, 1989.

Duberman, Martin. BLACK MOUNTAIN: AN EXPLORATION IN COMMUNITY. NY: Dutton Press, 1972.

Feldman, Gene. THE BEAT GENERATION AND THE ANGRY YOUND MEN. ed. G. Feldman and Max Gartenberg. Citadel Press, 1958.

Ferlinghetti, Lawrence and Nancy Joyce Peters. LITERARY SAN FRANCISCO. City Lights, Harper Row, 1980.

Foley, Jack. THE BEAT GENERATION GALLERIES. Davis, CA: John Natsoulao Press, 1996.

Gold, Herbert. BOHEMIA: DIGGING THE ROOTS OF COOL. NY: Simon and Schuster Touchstone, 1994.

Gruen, John. THE NEW BOHEMIA. photographs by Fred McDarrah. Chicago: A Cappella, 1990.

Halberstam, David. THE FIFTIES. NY: Villard Books, 1993.

Johnson, Joyce. MINOR CHARACTERS. Houghton-Mifflin, 1983.

Jones, Hettie. HOW I BECAME HETTIE JONES. NY: Penguin Books, 1991.

Knight, Brenda. WOMEN OF THE BEAT GENERATION. Berkeley, CA: Conari Press, 1996.

Knight, Arthur and Knight, Kit. THE BEAT JOURNEY. 1978.

Knight, Arthur Winfield. THE BEAT VISION: A PRIMARY SOURCEBOOK. Paragon House Publishers, 1987.

Lauridsen, Inger Thorp and Per Dalgard. ed. THE BEAT GENERATION AND THE RUSSIAN NEW WAVE. Ann Arbor: Ardis, 1990.

Lipton, Lawrence. THE HOLY BARBARIANS. Mesner, 1959.

Maguire, Molly, ed. and intro. THE BEAT MAP OF AMERICA. Aaron Blake Pubs., 1987.

Mailer, Norman. THE WHITE NEGRO. City Lights, 1957.

Maynard, John A. VENICE WEST: THE BEAT GENERATION IN SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA. Rutgers University, 1993.

McClure, Michael. LIGHTING THE CORNERS: ON ART, NATURE AND THE VISIONARY. Albuquerque: U of New Mexico P, 1993.

McClure, Michael. SCRATCHING THE BEAT SURFACE. North Point, 1992.

McDarrah, Fred and Gloria. THE BEAT GENERATION: GLORY DAYS IN GREENWICH VILLAGE. Schirmer Books, 1996.

McDarrah, Fred W. and McDarrah, Patrick. THE GREENWICH VILLAGE GUIDE.

McNally, Dennis. DESOLATION ANGEL: JACK KEROUAC, THE BEAT GENERATION AND AMERICA. Delta Books, 1979.

Morgan, Bill. THE BEAT GENERATION IN NEW YORK. City Lights: San Francisco, 1997.

Peters, Robert. THE GREAT AMERICAN POETRY BAKE-OFF. Metuchen, NJ: Scarecrow Press, Inc., 1979.

Parkinson, Thomas Francis. A CASEBOOK ON THE BEAT. Crowell, 1961.

Parry, Albert. GARRETS AND PRETENDERS: A HISTORY OF BOHEMIANISM IN AMERICA. Mineola, NY: Dover Publications, Inc., 1960.

Pivano, Fernanda. BEAT HIPPIE YIPPIE.

Polsky, Ned. HUSTLERS, BEATS AND OTHERS. Aldine, 1967.

Rexroth, Kenneth. THE ALTERNATIVE SOCIETY: ESSAYS... Saroyan, Aram. GENESIS ANGELS, THE SAGA OF LEW WELCH AND THE BEAT GENERATION. Morrow, 1979.

Sukenik, Ronald. DOWN AND IN. Macmillan, 1988.

Talbot, Ashleigh. BEAT SPEAK: An Illustrated Beat Glosary 1956-1959. Water Row Books, Sudbury, MA, 1997.

Tytell, John. NAKED ANGELS: THE LIFE AND LITERATURE OF THE BEAT GENERATION. McGraw-Hill, 1976.

Unbearables. CRIMES OF THE BEATS. New York: Autonomedia, 1998.

Waldman, Anne, ed. THE BEAT BOOK. 1996.

Watson, Steven. BIRTH OF THE BEAT GENERATION. New York: Pantheon Books, 1995.

Watts, Alan. BEAT ZEN, SQUARE ZEN, AND ZEN. City Lights, 1959.

ACADEMIC CRITICISM:

Aldridge, John W. AFTER THE LOST GENERATION: A CRITICAL STUDY OF TWO WARS. NY: McGraw-Hill Co., 1951.

Austen, Roger. PLAYING THE GAME: THE HOMOSEXUAL NOVEL IN AMERICA. NY: Bobbs-Merrill, 1977.

Bartlett, Lee. ed. THE BEATS: ESSAYS IN CRITICISM. McFarland, 1981.

Charters, Ann. THE BEATS: LITERARY BOHEMIANISM IN POSTWAR AMERICA, PARTS I AND II. Dictionary of Literary Biography, Volume 16. Bruccoli Clark/Gale, 1983.

Felver, Christopher. ANGELS, ANARCHISTS AND GODS. Louisiana State University, 1996.

Foster, Edward Halsey. UNDERSTANDING THE BEATS. U of South Carolina P, 1992.

French, Warren G. THE SAN FRANCISCO POETRY RENAISSANCE. Twayne, 1991.

Herron, Don. THE LITERARY WORLD OF SAN FRANCISCO AND IT'S ENVIRONS. City Lights, 1985.

Holmes, John Clellon. PASSIONATE OPINIONS: THE CULTURAL ESSAYS. U of Arkansas P, 1988.

Holmes, John Clellon. REPRESENTATIVE MEN. U of Arkansas P, 1988.

Ostergarrd, Geoffrey. LATTER-DAY ANARCHISM: THE POLITICS OF THE AMERICAN BEAT GENERATION. Ahmedabad, Harold Laski Institute of Political Science, 1964.

Rigney, Francis J. and Smith, Doulgas L. THE REAL BOHEMIA: SOCIOLOGICAL AND PSYCHOLOGICAL STUDY OF THE 'BEATS'. NY: Basic Books, Inc., 1961.

Stephenson, Gregory. DAYBREAK BOYS, ESSAYS ON THE LITERATURE OF THE BEAT GENERATION. Southern Illinois, UP, 1990.

Watson, Steven. THE BIRTH OF THE BEAT GENERATION. NY: Pantheon Books, 1995.

COLLECTIONS WITH SOME BEAT COMMENTARY:

Berthoff, Warner. A LITERATURE WITHOUT QUALITIES: AMERICAN WRITING SINCE 1945. Berkeley: U of California P, 1979.

Bradshaw, Steve. CAFE SOCIETY: BOHEMIAN LIFE FROM SWIFT TO BOB DYLAN. NY: Weidenfeld, 1978.

Bryant, Jerry H. THE OPEN DECISION: THE CONTEMPORARY AMERCIAN NOVEL AND ITS INTELLECTUAL BACKGROUND. NY: The Free Press, 1970.

Burgess, Anthony. THE NOVEL NOW: A GUIDE TO CONTEMPORARY FICTION. NY: W.W. Norton and Co., 1967.

Charters, Samuel. SOME POEMS/POETS; STUDIES IN AMERICAN UNDERGROUND POETRY SINCE 1945. Kensington, CA: Oyez, 1972.

Donald, Miles. THE AMERICAN NOVEL IN THE TWENTIETH CENTURY. NY: Barnes and Noble, 1978.

Edmiston, Susan and Linda D. Cirino. LITERARY NEW YORK: A HISTORY AND GUIDE. Boston: Hougton Mifflin, 1976.

Faas, Ekbert, editor. TOWARDS A NEW AMERICAN POETICS: ESSAYS AND INTERVIEWS. Santa Rosa, CA: Black Sparrow Press, 1978.

Feied, Frederick. NO PIE IN THE SKY: THE HOBO AS AMERICAN CULTURAL HERO IN THE WORKS OF JACK LONDON, JOHN DOS PASSOS AND JACK KEROUAC. Secaucus, NJ: Citadel Press, 1964.

Fiedler, Leslie. LOVE AND DEATH IN THE AMERICAN NOVEL. NY: Stein and Day, revised edition, 1966.

Fiedler, Leslie. THE RETURN OF THE VANISHING AMERICAN. NY: Stein and Day, 1968.

Fuller, Edmund. MAN IN MODERN FICTION, SOME MINORITY OPINIONS ON CONTEMPORARY AMERICAN WRITING. NY: Random House, 1958.

Geismar, Maxwell David. AMERICAN MODERNS, FROM REBELLION TO CONFORMITY. NY: Hill and Wang, 1958.

Gluck, Louise. ed. THE BEST AMERICAN POETRY 1993. NY: Collier, 1993.

Harrison, Gilbert A., editor. THE CRITIC AS ARTIST: ESSAYS ON BOOKS 1920-1970 (with an introduction by H.L. Menken). NY: Liveright, 1972.

Hassan, Ihab Habib. RADICAL INNOCENCE: STUDIES IN THE CONTEMPORARY AMERICAN NOVEL. Princeton, NJ: Princeton UP, 1961.

Hassan, Ihab Habib. CONTEMPORARY AMERICAN LITERATURE, 1945-1972; AN INTRODUCTION. NY: Ungar Pub., Co., 1973.

Hoffman, Daniel, ed. HARVARD GUIDE TO CONTEMPORARY AMERICAN WRITING. Cambridge, MA: Belknap Press of Harvard U, 1979.

Hoffman, Frederick John. MODERN NOVEL IN AMERICA, 1900-1950. Washington, D.C.: Regnery Gateway, Inc., 1951.

Hoffman, Frederick John. THE MORTAL NO: DEATH AND THE MODERN IMAGINATION. Princeton, NJ: Princeton UP, 1964.

Howard, Richard. ALONE WITH AMERICA: ESSAYS ON THE ART OF POETRY IN THE UNITED STATES SINCE 1950. NY: Atheneum Publishers, 1969.

Howe, Irving. A WORLD MORE ATTRACTIVE: A VIEW OF MODERN LITERATURE AND POLITICS. NY: Horizon Press, 1963.

Kaufman, Alan. THE OUTLAW BIBLE OF AMERICAN POETRY. Thunder's Mouth Press, 1999.

Kazin, Alfred. BRIGHT BOOK OF LIFE: AMERICAN NOVELISTS AND STORYTELLERS FROM HEMINGWAY TO MAILER. NY: Atlantic Monthly Press/Little Brown and Co., 1973.

Kostelanetz, Richard. TWENTIES IN THE SIXTIES: PREVIOUSLY UNCOLLECTED CRITICAL ESSAYS. Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, Inc., 1979.

McCarthy, Mary. THE WRITING ON THE WALL AND OTHER LITERAY ESSAYS. San Diego, CA: Harcourt, Brace and World, Inc., 1970.

Podhoretz, Norman. DOINGS AND UNDOINGS: THE FIFTIES AND AFTER IN AMERICAN WRITING. NY: Farrar, Straus and Giroux, Inc., 1964.

Prescott, Orville. IN MY OPINION: AN INQUIRY INTO THE COMTEMPORARY NOVEL. NY: Bobbs-Merrill Co., Inc., 1952.

THE REVIEW OF CONTEMPORARY FICTION. Fall, Grove Press, 1990.

Rickett, Arthur. VAGABOND IN LITERATURE. Ayer Co. Pubs., 1968.

Shepard, Sam. "ROLLING THUNDER" LOGBOOK. NY: Viking Press, 1977.

Simpson, Louis. A REVOLUTION IN TASTE: STUDIES OF DYLAN THOMAS, ALLEN GINSBERG, SYLVIA PLATH AND ROBERT LOWELL. NY: Macmillan Publishing Co., 1978.

Solnit, Rebecca. ed. SECRET EXHIBITION: SIX CALIFORNIA ARTISTS OF THE COLD WAR ERA. City Lights, 1990.

Solotaroff, Theodore. THE RED HOT VACUUM AND OTHER PIECES ON THE WRITING OF THE SIXTIES. NY: Atheneum Publishers, 1970.

Stauffer, Donald Barlow. A SHORT HISTORY OF AMERICAN POETRY. NY: E.P. Cutton and Co., Inc., 1972.

Straumann, Heinrich. AMERICAN LITERATURE IN THE TWENTIETH CENTURY. NY: Harper and Row Publishers, Inc., 1965.

Sutton, Walter. AMERICAN FREE VERSE: THE MODERN REVOLUTION IN POETRY. NY: New Directions Pub. Corp., 1973.

Tanner, Tony. CITY OF WORDS, AMERICAN FICTION, 1950-1970. NY: Harper and Row Pub., Inc., 1971.

Trilling, Diana. CLAREMONT ESSAYS. San Diego, CA: Harcourt, Brace and World, Inc., 1964.

Vendler, Helen. ed. THE HARVARD BOOK OF CONTEMPORARY AMERICAN POETRY. Cambridge: Harvard Belknap, 1985.

Vendler, Helen. PART OF NATURE, PART OF US: MODERN AMERICAN POETS. Cambridge, MA: Harvard UP, 1980.

Von Hallberg, Robert. AMERICAN POETRY AND CULTURE: 1945-1980. Cambridge, MA: Harvard UP, 1985.

Waldmeir, Joseph J., editor. RECENT AMERICAN FICTION: SOME CRITICAL VIEWS. Boston, MA: Houghton-Mifflin Co., 1963.

Waldmeir, Joseph J. AMERICAN NOVELS OF THE SECOND WORLD WAR (studies in Amercian Literature, Vol. 20). Hawthorne, NY: Mouton and Co., 1969.

Weinberg, Jeffrey H. WRITERS OUTSIDE THE MARGIN. Sudbury, MA: Waterow, 1986.

Weinberger, Eliot. ed. AMERICAN POETRY SINCE 1950: INNOVATORS AND OUTSIDERS. NY: Marsilio, 1993.

ANTHOLOGIES OF BEAT WRITING:

Allen, Donald M., ed. THE NEW AMERICAN POETRY 1945-1960. NY: Grove Press, 1960.

Allen, Donald and Creeley, Robert, editors. NEW AMERICAN STORY (with an introduction by Warren Tallman). NY: Grove Press, 1965.

Allen, Donald and Tallman, Warren, editors. POETICS OF THE NEW AMERICAN POETRY. NY: Grove Press, 1973.

Allen, Donald and Butterick, George F., editors. THE POSTMODERNS: THE NEW AMERICAN POETRY REVISED. NY: Evergreen/Grove, distributed by Random House, 1982.

Annis, Michael, ed. STILETTO, VOLUME ONE. Kansas City, MO: Howling Dog Press, 1989.

Baro, Gene, editor. "BEAT" POETS. Dallas, TX: Vista Books/Longacre Press, 1961.

Baro, Gene, ed. FAMOUS AMERICAN POEMS. Dallas, TX: Vista Books/Longacre Press, 1962.

BEATITUDE ANTHOLOGY. San Francisco, CA: City Lights Books, 1960.

Charters, Ann. THE PORTABLE BEAT READER. NY: Viking, 1992.

Feldman, Gene and Gartenberg, Max, editors. PROTEST. London: Souvenir Press, 1959.

Fisher, Stanley, editor. BEAT COAST: AN ANTHOLOGY OF REBELLION. NY: Excelsior Press Publishers, 1960.

Frank, Robert and Sayre, Henry, editors. THE LINE IN POSTMODERN POETRY. Champaign, IL: U of Illinois P, 1988.

Harvey, Nick, editor. MARK IN TIME: PORTRAITS AND POETRY/SAN FRANCISCO. San Francisco, CA: Glide Publications, 1971.

Hoffman, Frederick J., editor. MARGINAL MANNERS: THE VARIANTS OF BOHEMIA. NY: Row, Peterson and Company, 1962.

Honan, Park. editor. THE BEATS: AN ANTHOLOGY OF "BEAT" WRITING. NY: J.M. Dent and Sons, Ltd., 1987.

Hoover, Paul. ed. POSTMODERN AMERICAN POETRY: A NORTON ANTHOLOGY. NY: W.W. Norton, 1994.

Horemans, Rudi. BEAT INDEED!. EXA(Belgium), 1985.

James, Laurence. ed. ELECTRIC UNDERGROUND - A CITY LIGHTS READER. London: New English Library, 1973.

Jones, LeRoi. THE MODERNS: AN ANTHOLOGY OF NEW WRITING IN AMERICA. NY: Corinth Books, 1963.

Kherdian, David. ed. BEAT VOICES: AN ANTHOLOGY OF BEAT POETRY. NY: Holt, 1995.

Kherdian, David. SIX POETS OF THE SAN FRANCISCO RENAISSANCE: PORTRAITS AND CHECKLISTS (with an introduction by William Saroyan), Morris, NY: Giligia Press, 1967.

Krim, Seymour. ed. THE BEATS. Greenwich, CN: Fawcett, 1960.

Lee, Robert A. THE BEAT GENERATION WRITERS. Boulder: Pluto Press, 1996.

Peabody, Richard, ed. A DIFFERENT BEAT: WRITINGS BY WOMEN OF THE BEAT GENERATION. New York: Serpent's Tail, 1997.

Rosset, Barney, ed. EVERGREEN REVIEW READER 1967-1973. New York: Four Walls Eight Windows, 1998.

Seaver, Richard. ed. WRITERS IN REVOLT: AN ANTHOLOGY. Hollywood, FL: Frederick Fell Publishers, Inc., 1963.

Wilentz, Elias. ed. THE BEAT SCENE. NY: Corinth, 1960.

Wolf, Daniel and Fancher, Edwin. editors. THE VILLAGE VOICE READER: A MIXED BAG FROM THE GREENWICH VILLAGE NEWSPAPER. NY: Doubleday and Co., Inc., 1962.

ARTICLES:

Adams, J.D. "On Writers of Beat Generation," NEW YORK TIMES BOOK REVIEW, VII (May 18, 1957), 2.

Aksyonov, Vassily. "Beatniks and Bolsheviks: Rebels Without (and With) a Cause," NEW REPUBLIC, v. 197, 30 November 1987, 28.

Algren, Nelson. "Chicago Is a Wose," NATION, 188 (February 28, 1959), 191.

Amis, Kingsley. "The Delights of Literary Lecturing," HARPER'S MAGAZINE, CCXIX (October 1959), 181-182.

Aronowitz, Alfred G. "The Yen for Zen," ESCAPADE (October 1960), 50-52, 70.

Baker, G. "Avant Garde at the Golden Gate," SATURDAY REVIEW, 41 (August 3, 1957), 10.

"Bam; roll on with bam," TIME, 74 (September 14, 1959), 28.

"Bang, bong, bing," TIME, 74 (September 7, 1959), 74.

Baro, Gene. "Beatniks Now and Then," NATION, 189 (September 5, 1959), 115-117.

"Beat Friar," TIME, 73 (May 25, 1959), 58.

"The Beat Generation: Behind the Scenes," LA TIMES (Orange County Edition/Life and Style Section) 27 August 1998.

"The 'Beat' Generation," CURRENT AFFAIRS BULLETIN (Australia), 7 December 1959, 35-48.

"Beatniks just sick, sick, sick," SCIENCE DIGEST, 46 (July 1959), 25-26.

"Big Day for Bards at Bay: Trial over 'Howl' and other Poems," LIFE, 43 (September 9, 1957), 105-108.

"Blazing and the Beat," TIME, 71 (February 24, 1958), 104.

Bradbury, M. "Reviews of Lawrence Lipton's HOLY BARBARIANS," REPORTER, 21 (July 9, 1959), 40-42.

Burdick, Eugene. "The Innocent Nihilists Adrift in Squaresville," THE REPORTER, 18 (April 3, 1958), 30-33.

Burns, Jim. "Yugen," POETRY INFORMATION (London), 16 (Winter 1976-1977), 39-41.

Butler, F.A. "On the Beat Nature of Beat," 30 (Winter 1960-1961), 79-92.

Carruth, H. "Four New Books," POETRY, 93 (November 1958), 107-116.

Ciardi, John. "Book Burners and Sweet Sixteen," SATURDAY REVIEW, 42 (July 25, 1959), 22-23.

Ciardi, John. "Epitaph for the Dead Beats," SATURDAY REVIEW, 43 (February 6, 1960), 11-13.

Conmy, P.T. WILSON LIBRARY BULLETIN, 32 (June 1958), 723-725.

"Cool, Cool Bards," TIME, 70 (December 2, 1957), 71.

"Correspondence: The Beat Generation," PARTISAN REVIEW, 25 (1958): 472-479.

"Daddy-O," NEW YORKER, 34 (May 3, 1958), 29-30.

Daniels, Guy. "Post-Mortem on San Francisco," THE NATION, 187 (August 2, 1958), 53-55.

Dickey, James. "From Babel to Byzantium," SEWANEE REVIEW, LXV (Summer 1957), 508-530.

Dumas, Alan. "Acid Test Mythology of the Beats Goes On," DENVER ROCKY MOUNTAIN NEWS 13 July 1997.

Eberhart, Richard. "Richard Eberhart Discusses Group of Young Poets on West Coast," NEW YORK TIMES BOOK REVIEW, VII (September 2, 1956), 4.

Eckman, Frederick. COBRAS AND COCKLE SHELLS (NY: Vagrom Chap Book #5, 1958).

Eckman, Frederick. "Neither Tame nor Fleecy," POETRY, 90 (September 1957), 386-397.

"Every Man a Beatnik?" NEWSWEEK, 53 (June 29, 1959), 83.

"Far-out Mission; Bread and Wine Mission," TIME, 73 (June 29, 1959), 38.

Fischer, J. "Editor's Easy Chair: Old Original Beatnik," HARPER'S MAGAZINE, 218 (April 1959), 14-16.

Fleischmann, Wolfgang B. "A Look at the Beat Generation Writers, " CAROLINA QUARTERLY, 11 (Spring 1959), 13-20.

Fleischmann, Wolfgang B. "Those 'Beat' Writers," AMERICA, 26 September 1959, 766-768.

"Fried Shoes; Beatniks," TIME, 73 (February 9, 1959), 16.

Gleason, Ralph. "Kerouac's Beat Generation," SATURDAY REVIEW, 41 (January 11, 1958), 75.

Glicksberg, Charles I. "The Rage of Repudiation: Polemic of the Beats," SOUTHWEST REVIEW, 45 (Autumn 1960), 338-344.

Gold, Herbert. "How to Tell the Beatniks from the Hipsters, " THE NOBLE SAVAGE, No. 1 (Spring 1960), 132-139.

Golffing, Francis, and Barbara Gibbs, "The Public Voice: Remarks on Poetry Today," COMMENTARY, XXVIII (July 1959), 63-69.

Heckt, Anthony. "The Anguish of the Spirit and the Letter," HUDSON REVIEW, XII (Winter 1959-1960), 593-603.

Holmes, John Clellon. NOTHING MORE TO DECLARE. NY: Dutton, 1967. (includes "This Is The Beat Generation," 1952; "The Philosophy of the Beat Generation," 1958; "The Name of the Game," 1965.)

Howe, Irving. "Mass Society and Post-Modern Fiction, " PARTISAN REVIEW, XXXVI (Summer 1959), 420-436.

Hynes, S. "Beat and Angry," COMMONWEAL, 68 (September 5, 1958), 559-561.

Jacobsen, Dan. "America's Angry Young Men," COMMENTARY, 24 (December 1957), 475-479.

Jones, LeRoi, David Fitelson and Norman Podhoretz. "The Beat Generation," PARTISAN REVIEW, 25 (Summer 1958), 472-479.

Kazin, Alfred. "Psychoanalysis and Contemporary Literary Culture," PSYCHOANALYSIS AND PSHYCHOANALYTIC REVIEW, 45 (1958): 41-51. Rpt. in PARTISAN REVIEW, 26 (1959): 45-55.

Krim, Seymour. "A Hungry Mental Lion," EVERGREEN REVIEW, Vol. IV, No. 11, 178-185.

Krim, Seymour. "Review of the HOLY BARBARIANS," EVERGREEN REVIEW, Vol.III, No. 9, 208-214.

Latham, Aaron. "The Columbia Murder That Gave Birth to the Beats." NY MAGAZINE, 19 April 1976, 41-53.

Leonard, G.B., Jr. "Bored, the Bearded and the Beat," LOOK, 22 (August 19, 1958), 64-68.

Leonard, John. "Epitaph for the Beat Generation," NATIONAL REVIEW, VII (September 12, 1959), 331.

"The Little Magazine in America: A Modern Documentary History," TRI-QUARTERLY, 43 (Fall 1978).

McFadden, J.P. "Howling in the Wilderness," NATIONAL REVIEW, VII (September 12, 1959), 338-339.

MacGregor-Hastie, Roy. "Wasteland in Russell Square," TRACE, No. 32 (June-July 1959), 1-5.

May, James Boyer. "Flipping the Coin(age)," TRACE, No.34 (October-November 1959), 20-27.

"Minister for the Beatniks; Bread and Wine Mission," NEWSWEEK, 53 (March 16, 1959), 88.

Montgomery, John. "Report from the Beat Generation," LIBRARY JOURNAL, 84 (June 15, 1959), 1999-2000.

Moore, Rosalie. "The Beat and the Unbeat," POETRY, 93 (November 1958), 2.

"New Test for Obscenity," NATION, 185 (November 9, 1957), 314.

Offen, Ronald. "Editorial: Ginsberg Revisited," ODYSSEY, Vol. I, No. 4, 5-10.

O'Neil, Paul. "The Only Rebellion Around," LIFE, 47 (November 30, 1959), 115-116, 119-120, 123-126, 129-130.

"On The Road Again: Beat Culture Is Revistited in an Exhibit at the Whitney Museum," LA TIMES (Home Edition/Calendar Section) 9 Nove. 1995.

Perlman, David. "How Captain Hanrahan Made 'Howl' a Bestseller," REPORTER, 17 (December 12, 1957), 37-39.

Pinchbeck, Daniel. "Children of the Beats," NY TIMES (5 Nov. 1995).

Podell, Albert N. "Censorship on the Campus: The Case of the CHICAGO REVIEW," SAN FRANCISCO REVIEW, I (Spring 1959), 71-89.

Podhoretz, Norman. "Howl of Protest in San Francisco," NEW REPUBLIC, 137 (September, 1957), 30.

Podhoretz, Norman. "The Know-Nothing Bohemians," PARTISAN REVIEW, 25 (Spring 1958), 305-311, 313-316, 318.

Prichett, V.S. "The Beat Generation," NEW STATESMAN, 56 (September 6, 1958), 292-296.

Rexroth, Kenneth. "Disengagement: The Art of the Beat Generation," NEW WORLD WRITING, No. 11 (NY: New American Library, 1957), 28-41.

Rexroth, Kenneth. "Jazz Poetry," NATION, 186 (March 29, 1958), 282-283.

Rexroth, Kenneth. "The New American Poetry," HARPER'S MAGAZINE, 230 (June 1965), 65-71.

Rexroth, Kenneth. "Revolt: true and false," NATION, 186 (April 26, 1958), 378-379.

Rexroth, Kenneth. "San Francisco's Mature Bohemians," THE NATION, 184 (February 23, 1957), 159-162.

Rexroth, Kenneth. "The World Is Full of Stangers," NEW DIRECTIONS IN PROSE AND POETRY, No. 16 (1957), 181-199.

Roberts, John G. "The Frisco Beat," MAINSTREAM, 11 (July 1958), 11-26.

Rosenthal, M.L. "Naked and the Clad," NATION, 187 (October 11, 1958), 215.

Rosenthal, M.L. "Poet of the New Violence," NATION, 187 (October 11, 1958) 215.

Roskolenko, Harry. "The Jazz-Poets," PRAIRIE SCHOONER, XXXIII (Summer 1959), 148-153.

Ross, Basil. "California Young Writers, Angry and Otherwise," LIBRARY JOURNAL, 83 (June 15, 1958), 12.

Ryan, Richard. "Of the Beat Generation and Us," CATHOLIC WORLD, 187 (August 1958), 343-348.

Scott, James F., "Beat Literature and the American Teen Cult," AMERICAN QUARTERLY, 14 (Summer 1962), 150-160.

Shapiro, Karl. "Poets of the Silent Generation," PRAIRIE SCHOONER, XXXI (Winter 1957-1958), 298-299.

Shapiro, Karl. "Romanticism Comes Home," PRAIRIE SCHOONER, XXXI (Fall 1957), 182-183.

Sheed, Wilfred. "Beat Down and Beatific." NY TIMES BOOK REVIEW, 2 January 1972, 2, 21.

Sheed, Wilfred. "The Beat Movement, Concluded," NY TIMES BOOK REVIEW, 13 Fenruary 1972, 2, 32. Rpt. in THE GOOD WORD AND OTHER WORDS, 121-126. NY: Dutton, 1978.

Shepard, Mary. "And the Beat Goes On: Beat Generation Artists Make Come Back," UNIVERSITY WIRE, 16 Oct. 1998.

Sigal, Clancy. "Nihilism's Organization Man," UNIVERSITIES AND LEFT REVIEW, No. 4 (Summer 1958), 59-65.

Sisk, John P. "Beatniks and Tradition," THE COMMONWEAL, 70 (April 17, 1959), 74-77.

Smith, W.R. "Hipcats to Hipsters," NEW REPUBLIC, 138 (April 21, 1958), 18-20.

Spevack, Marvin. "Young Voices on the American Literary Scene: The Beat Generation." In SPIRIT OF A FREE SOCIETY: ESSAYS IN HONOR OF SENATOR JAMES WILLIAM FULBRIGHT ON THE OCCASION OF THE TENTH ANNIVERSARY OF THE GERMAN FULBRIGHT PROGRAM, p.313-330. By the U.S. Educational Commission and the Federal Republic of Germany. Heidelberg: Quelle and Meyer, 1962.

"Squaresville U.S.A. vs. Beatsville," LIFE, 47 (September 21, 1959), 31-37.

Stanford, Derek. "Beatniks and Angry Young Men," MEANJIN, XVII (Summer [December] 1958), 413-419.

Sutherland, Donald. "Petronius and The Art of the Novel," DENVER QUARTERLY, 13, No. 3 (1978): 7-16.

"Symposium on the Beat Poets," WAGNER LITERARY MAGAZINE (Spring 1959).

Tallman, Warren. "Kerouac's Sound," THE TAMARACK REVIEW, (Spring 1959), 58-74.

"Three Conversations on Art in LA," LA TIMES (Home Edition/Calendar Section) 9 Oct. 1998.

Tilling, Diana (pseud.) "The Other Night in Heaven," THE FIFTIES, No.3, 54-56. (parody of Diana Trilling's "The Other Night at Columbia"), 54-56.

Trilling, Diana. "The Other Night at Columbia," PARTISAN REVIEW, XXVI (Spring 1959), 214-230.

Tytell, John. "The Beat Generation and the Continuing American Revolution," AMERICAN SCHOLAR, 42 (1973): 308-317.

Van Den Haag, Ernest. "Conspicuous Consumption of Self," NATIONAL REVIEW, VI (April 11, 1959), 656-658.

Van Ghent, Dorothy. "Comment," WAGNER LITERARY MAGAZINE (Spring 1959), 27-28.

Wakefield, D. "Night Clubs," NATION, 186 (January 4, 1958), 19.

Widmer, Kingsley. "The Beat Generation in the Rise of Populist Culture," In THE FIFTIES: FICTION, POETRY, DRAMA, 155-173. Ed. Warren French. Deland, FL: Everett Edwards, 1970.

Winn, J. "Capote and Miss Parker," NEW REPUBLIC, 140 (February 9, 1959), 27-28.

Wolfe, Bernard. "Angry at What?" THE NATION, 187 (November 1, 1958), 316-322.

"Zen-Hur," TIME, 74 (December 14, 1959), 66.

ONLINE ARTICLES

Aronowitz, Al. "The Blacklisted Journalist, Part 1: The Beat Papers Of Al Aronowitz," May, 1997: www.bigmagic.com

MAGAZINES/JOURNALS: (includes work of Beat generation authors or were edited by its members)

ALPHA BEAT SOUP. No. 2, December, 1987.

ANGEL HAIR. Spring 1966-Spring 1969, NY: Anne Waldman and Lewis Marsh.

THE ARK. 1947-Winter 1957. San Francisco: James Harmon. No. 2 is Ark II/Moby I, ed. Michael McClure and James Harmon.

ART AND LITERATURE. March 1964-Spring 1967. Lausanne, Awitzerland: John Ashberry and others.

BASTARD ANGEL. Spring 1972-Fall 1974. San Francisco: Harold Norse.

BEATITUDE. 1959-1976. San Francisco: John Kelly and others.

BETWEEN WORLDS. Summer 1960-Winter 1962. San German, Puerto Rico and Denver: Gilbert Neiman.

BIG SKY. 1971-1978. Bolinas, CA: Bill Berkson.

BIG TABLE. Spring 1959-Fall 1960. Chicago: Irving Rosenthal, Paul Carroll.

BIRTH. Autumn 1958-Autumn 1960. NY: Tuli Kupferberg.

BIG MOUNTAIN REVIEW. Spring 1954-Autumn 1957. Black Mountain, NC: Robert Creeley.

BOUILLABAISE. Number 3, 1993.

BULLETIN FROM NOTHING. 1965. San Francisco: Mary Beach and Claude Pelieu.

C. May 1963-May 1966. NY: Ted Berrigan.

CHANGE. 1963. San Francisco: Ron Loewinsohn and Richard Brautigan.

CHANGE. Fall 1965-Spring 1966. Detroit: John and Magdalene Sinclair.

CHELSEA. Summer 1958- . NY: Robert Kelly, Ursule Molinaro, and others.

CHICAGO. Fall 1972-March 1973. Chicago: Alice Notley.

CHICAGO REVIEW. Winter 1946- . Chicago: Irving Rosenthal.

CIRCLE. Summer 1944-1948. Berkeley: George Leite.

CITY LIGHTS. July 1972-Spring 1955. San Francisco: Peter Martin and others.

CITY LIGHTS JOURNAL. 1963-1966. San Francisco: Lawrence Ferlinghetti.

CLIMAX. 1955-Summer 1956. New Orleans: R. Cass.

COASTLINES. Spring 1955-1964. Los Angeles: Mel Weisburd, Gene Frumkin and others.

COLDSPRING JOURNAL. Summer 1974-Spring 1979. Cherry Valley, NY: Charles Plymell and Joshua Norton.

COMBUSTION. January 1957-1966. Toronto: Raymond Souster.

CONTACT. December 1972-April 1973. Philadelphia: Jeff Goldberg.

CONTACT II. 1976- . NY: Maurice Kenney and J.G. Gosciak.

EL CORNO EMPLUMADO/THE PLUMED HORN. January 1962-July 1969. Mexico City: Sergio Mondragon, Margaret Randall and Harvey Wolin.

COYOTE'S JOURNAL. 1964-1974. Eugene, OR: James Killer, Edward Van Aelstyn and William Wroth.

CREDENCES. February 1975-March 1980. Kent, OH: Buffalo, NY: Robert Berthold.

THE DIGGER PAPERS. 1968. San Francisco.

EAST VILLAGE OTHER. October 1962-1972. NY: Allen Katzman.

EVERGREEN REVIEW. 1957-1973. NY: Barney Rosset and Donald Allen.

EXODUS. Spring 1959-Summer 1960. NY: Bernard Scott and Daniel Wolf.

FLOATING BEAR. Fall 1961-Summer 1971. NY: Diane di Prima and LeRoi Jones.

FOOT. 1959-1980. Berkeley; San Francisco: Richard Duerden and others.

FUCK YOU/A MAGAZINE OF THE ARTS. June 1962-1965. NY: Ed Sanders.

GENESIS WEST. Fall 1962-Winter 1965. Burlingame, CA: Gordon Lish.

THE GENRE OF SILENCE. June 1967. NY: Joel Oppenheimer.

GOAD. Summer 1951-January 1953. Columbus, OH; Sausalito, CA: Horace Schwartz.

GOLDEN GOOSE. Summer 1948-1952. Columbus, OH: Richard Wirtz Emerson, Frederick Eckman.

HEARSE. 1957-1972. Eureka, CA: E.V. Griffith.

INFERNO: 1950-1956. San Francisco: Leslie Woolf Hedley.

INTERIM PAD. Summer 1967. San Francisco: Lawrence Ferlinghetti.

JOURNAL FOR THE PROTECTION OF ALL BEINGS. Fall 1961-Fall 1978. San Francisco: Michael McClure, Lawrence Ferlinghetti, David Meltzer and Gary Snyder.

KULCHUR. Spring 1960-Winter 1965, 1966. NY: Marc D. Schleifer, Lita Hornick.

LINES. September 1964-November 1965. NY: Aram Saroyan.

LOCUS SOLUS. Winter 1961-1962. Lansen-Vercours, France: John 977- . Newburyport, MA: Diane Kruchkow.

TOOTHPASTE. 1970-1972. Iowa City: Allan Kornblum.

TREE. Winter 1970-Summer 1975. Santa Barbara: David Meltzer.

UNMUZZLED OX. November 1971- . California, PA: Arthur Knight, Glee Knight and Kit Knight.

UNSPEAKABLE VISIONS OF THE INDIVIDUAL. February 1971- . California, PA: Arthur Knight, Glee Knight and Kit Knight.

THE VILLAGE VOICE. October 1955- . NY: editor varies.

WHITE DOVE REVIEW. 1959-1960. Tulsa, OK: Ron Padgett, Joe Brainard and others.

WORK. Summer 1965-May 1968. Detroit: John Sinclair and others.

THE WORLD. 1967-1976. NY: Joel Sloman and Anne Waldman.

YEAH. December 1961-July 1965. NY: Tuli Kupferberg.

YUGEN. 1958-1962. NY: LeRoi Jones, Hettie Cohen.

PHOTOGRAPHIC COLLECTIONS:

Charters, Ann. SCENES ALONG THE ROAD. ed. Allen Ginsberg, photographer. Portents/Otham, 1970.

Ginsberg, Allen. SNAPSHOT POETICS: A PHOTOGRAPHIC MEMOIR OF THE BEAT ERA. Chronicle Books, 1992.

Ginsberg, Allen. PHOTOGRAPHS. Altadena: Twelvetrees Press, 1990.

SCENES ALONG THE ROAD: PHOTOGRAPHS OF THE DESOLATION ANGELS. San Francisco: City Lights Books, 1984.

Stoll, Jerry. I AM A LOVER. photographer. Evan S. Connell Jr., editor. Angel Island, 1961.

BIBLIOGRAPHIES:

Cook, Ralph. THE CITY LIGHTS POETS SERIES: A DESCRIPTIVE BIBLIOGRPAHY. La Jolla, CA: Laurence McGilvery, 1982.

Hickey, Morgan. THE BOHEMIAN REGISTER: AN ANNOTATED BIBLIOGRAPHY OF THE BEAT LITERARY MOVEMENT. Scarecrow Press, 1990.

Lepper, Gary M. A BIBLIOGRAPHICAL INTRODUCTION TO SEVENTY-FIVE MODERN AMERICAN AUTHORS. Livermore, CA: Serendipity Books, 1976.

INTERVIEWS:

Meltzer, David, ed. THE SAN FRANCISCO POETS. NY: Ballantine Books, 1971.

Ossman, David. THE SULLEN ART: INTERVIEWS BY DAVID OSSMAN WITH MODERN AMERICAN POETS. NY: Corinth Books, 1963.

WRITERS AT WORK: THE 'PARIS REVIEW' INTERVIEWS, third series, (introduction by Alfred Kazin), prepared for book publication by George Pimpton. NY: Viking Press, 1967. (includes interviews with William Burroughs, Allen Ginsberg nad Norman Mailer)

CATALOGUES:

CITY LIGHTS

Musser, James P., editor. SKYLINE BOOKS: COUNTERCULTURE, BEAT AND MODERN. Catalogue #3, P.O. Box T, Forest Knolls, CA: 94933, 1989.

WATER ROW BOOKS, P.O. Box 438, Sudbury, MA 01776. Catalogue available upon request through snail-mail at the address above or through e-mail: waterrow@aol.com.

Wirshup, David S., editor. THE BEAT GENERATION WRITERS. NY: Anacapa Books, 1977.

AUDIO COLLECTIONS:

THE BEAT GENERATION BOXED SET. Rhino, 1992. ISBN 0-930589-88-2. CD($49.98) and Cassette($39.98) - available through Water Row Books

THE BEAT GENERATION SAMPLER. Rhino, 1992. $25.00 - available through Water Row Books

ALLEN GINSBERG, HOLY SOUL JELLY ROLL: POEMS AND SONGS 1949-1993. Rhino, 1994. ISBN 1-56826-425-9. Cassette($39.99)

HOWLS, RAPS AND ROARS: RECORDINGS FROM THE SAN FRANCISCO POETRY RENAISSANCE. Berkeley: Fantasy, 1993. 4 CD Set($65.00).

THE JACK KEROUAC COLLECTION. Rhino, 1990. 4 LP's($49.98),4 Cassettes($39.98), 3 CD's($49.98) - available through Water Row Books.

CD ROM

THE BEAT EXPERIENCE. Voyager, 1996.

POETRY IN MOTION. Spoken word: Ginsberg, DiPrima, Carroll, Waldman, Snyder, Burroughs.

POETRY IN MOTION II. Spoken word: Ginsberg, DiPrima, Waldman, Snyder, Burroughs.

Literary Kicks
Contributed by Sherri

FORTUNE (Philadelphia) — The Barnes art collection has finally moved. One of the world’s most valuable private collections of art now resides on a 4.5 acre campus in downtown Philadelphia, against — it needs to be said — the wishes of its founder, the late Dr. Albert C. Barnes, who had willed it to remain at his home in Lower Merion, Penn., a suburb six miles from downtown.

The move, nearly 10 years in the making, comes after decades of legal battles, financial struggles, unethical political maneuvers, and vociferous protest from art purists, all well documented in the controversial 2009 film The Art of the Steal. The documentary details the Barnes Foundation’s efforts to dismantle and reinterpret the Barnes will and the evolution of a private estate into a major public institution.

Expect some demonstrations when the Foundation opens its doors to the public this Saturday.

The capital fund for the project topped $200 million, including $150 million for a new environmentally sustainable building on Benjamin Franklin Parkway, and $50 million for a new endowment. The project was bankrolled by Comcast, PNC Bank, the Pew Charitable Trusts, the Annenberg Foundation, as well as taxpayers, in the form of public funding from both Pennsylvania and the city of Philadelphia.

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This weekend the opening will be celebrated with a series of galas to honor those wealthy patrons, corporate donors, and charitable trusts. That’s enough posturing to make the socially-averse Dr. Barnes roll in his grave.

A chemist, Dr. Barnes was a self-made millionaire who built his fortune with the gonorrhea drug Argyrol, and in 1912 began a lifelong pursuit of collecting paintings that he considered to be masterpieces. Over the next 40 years, he assembled the largest private collection of Modernist and Post-Impressionist art in the world, including 181 works by Renoir, 69 by Cezanne, 59 by Matisse, 7 by van Gogh, 46 by Picasso, 18 by Rousseau, and dozens of Old Master paintings by El Greco, Veronese, Tintoretto, Durer, Rubens and others. The collection also includes 125 African sculptures, masks, and tools. It is estimated that the Foundation’s holdings of more than 2,500 objects are worth more than $25 billion.

Before a 1951 car accident ended his life at age 79, Barnes had explicitly expressed his desire to keep his collection out of the hands of Philadelphia’s Main Line society, with the intention for the art to remain an educational tool for art students.

The history of Barnes’s obsessive control over his art collection is well documented. In his lifetime he received many requests from strangers who wanted to see the collection, which he made available only to select audiences, usually students or artists who would write for permission to visit the house in Merion. Barnes penned witty responses, usually invoking a pseudonym to maintain an elusive presence.

Requests from art critics were categorically denied, usually signed by Barnes’s dog Fidèle with an inked pawprint. In 1939, he (writing in third person while pretending to be a secretary) responded to auto baron Walter P. Chrysler: “because he gave strict orders that he is not to be disturbed during his present strenuous efforts to break the world’s record for goldfish swallowing.”

Barnes’ letters are currently on display in the museum in a temporary exhibition about the physicist’s life. The art is on permanent display exactly as Barnes intended, in a series of galleries meant to recreate the house in Merion. Catering to the Barnes purists (and theoretically adhering to Barnes’s original sketches), the layout, structure, and design of the house have been completely replicated in the new building.

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Unfortunately the curators decided to continue Barnes’s tradition of cluttering each wall with too many canvases, often stacking them three or four high, keeping many paintings much too high for the eyes of any observer, regardless of their height or interest. This is a collection that demands attention as well as time. The two and a half hours this reporter spent with it weren’t enough to appreciate the hundreds of paintings, which are jammed, albeit symmetrically, into 24 rooms. Barnes was a genius art collector, but he wasn’t a very talented gallerist.

The centerpiece of the collection is Matisse’s transcendent masterpiece “The Joy of Life,” which is given a prominent position in a small gallery on the second floor. At the house in Merion, the painting was difficult to see because of poor lighting and an awkward location above a stairway.  Now the bright pastels of its pastoral scene can be viewed up close.

Barnes also collected wrought-iron objects. Spatulas, door handles, hinges, keyhole coverings and the like are interspersed throughout the galleries like punctuation, as if to accentuate the frustrating displays on each wall.  A selection of period furniture is also symmetrically arranged, adding a homey atmosphere that seems out of place in such a minimalist structure.

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The architecture, designed by Tod Williams Billie Tsien Architects, is commanding, clean, and purposeful. The exteriors are covered with textured gray and gold limestone, and a shallow moat runs the length of the building. Visitors walk down a pathway lined with Japanese maples before crossing a footbridge to the entrance. The interior of the two-story building is decorated in natural wood tones, and two tree-filled atriums lend a natural aesthetic to the “garden within a gallery” theme.

The decision to move the art into a space that replicates the Merion home makes the endeavor seem superfluous.  But there are two main advantages of the new campus that make the move worthwhile: an improvement in lighting design (by Paul Marantz) from the collection’s previous home and the accessibility to masses of tourists. A lecture hall and two state of the art classrooms are artfully hidden within the wings of the gallery space, and the Foundation’s archives and libraries dedicated to art and horticulture are given ample space for students.

Barnes’s original intent to restrict visitors seems no longer reasonable, especially since the needs of arts institutions have vastly changed over the past 60 years. For a museum to survive, it needs to be seen. Art can’t exist in the U.S. without big business or the private sector today.

It’s not possible to know whether Barnes himself would approve of the new campus in Philadelphia. He probably would’ve taken issue with the gift shop in the basement, or the onsite restaurant, or maybe even the coffee shop.

On Wednesday, a handful of protesters had already gathered outside the front gates, holding black signs with white lettering that read: “RIP Donor Intent.”  Hopefully they’ll soon discover causes that have greater importance.

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